Wish to have Android apps On Windows or Mac

“Android is not just for Android devices any more. Thanks to the BlueStacks App Player, you can run your favorite Android apps on PCs running Windows XP, Vista or 7. You can run them on a PC or even a tablet running Windows 8. If you’ve got a Mac, BlueStacks will let you run Android apps on it as well. This nifty player won Best of CES last year — and it’s free.”

Have you got some favorite smartphone apps? Not convinced by Microsoft’s new Windows app selection? Itching to see some Android action on your MacBook Pro? Don’t worry, just install an Android emulator on your Windows or Mac machine and run all of the Android apps that you’ve grown to love.

A version is even available for Windows 8 Surface tablets. Load up to 750,000 Android apps, including games, SMS text messaging, and media apps.

The free product that lets you do this is BlueStacks App Player, and it claims more than 5 million downloads.

Here’s how to go about loading and running the BlueStacks emulator:

Installation and Use

Step 1: Browse to the BlueStacks Web page on a desktop computer or laptop and click on the download button for your operating system. Choose between XP, Vista and Windows 7; Windows 8; or Mac.

Follow the usual steps for installing software, opening the .exe file. Follow the prompts to allow installation and then accept the terms of the license agreement by clicking on the Welcome to BlueStacks’ Continue button.

Step 2: Verify that App Store Access and App Notification check boxes are enabled on the following screen and then click Install. Allow the BlueStacks application to load.

Step 3: Click on the My Apps tile and then on the App Search button.

Search for an app that you use regularly on your smartphone or tablet. For example, I searched for Falcon Pro, a robust, paid-for Twitter client I like. Allow the in-Bluestacks search to complete and then click on the Install button adjacent to the search result.

Tip: The app doesn’t install from this search. This search just tells you which store has the app you want.

Step 4: Choose an app store from the selection. I chose the Google native Play store, but there will be others listed, including Amazon.

Tip: Choose the store that you normally use on your device. It will be cheaper to migrate an app that you’ve already paid for.

Step 5: Add your account details if prompted. If you already have a Google account, add it here. Allow any sync to take place and then select Finish Setup. Click on any terms and conditions check boxes and then press Continue.

Step 6: Perform a second search for the app that you want to install. Allow the search to take place and then choose Accept and Download. Allow the app to install and then open the app. This search is from within the store that you may be familiar with, like Play.

Tip: Use the on-screen keyboard that pops up rather than the PC’s physical keyboard if you run into keyboard mapping issues when communicating with the app.


Blowfish12@2013 Blowfish12.tk Author: Sudharsun. P. R.

Planning to buy a cell Phone? why not Build it!

David Mellis is a graduate student in the High-Low Tech lab, a group of engineering has built a custom cell phone himself. In 2005, he helped found Arduino, a company that makes easy-to-program microprocessors and sells them on simple circuit boards. The idea is to help people make electronic products without needing a degree in computer science.

custombuiltcellphone

They’re popular among hobbyists, hackers and the sort of people who end up working at the Media Lab but they’re hardly mainstream. Mellis wondered if he could take the idea further  and build a cell phone. “The tricky thing is getting it beyond the people who are already doing electronics stuff,” he says. So he decided to see if he could design consumer electronics that you can make yourself and actually use. He started with radios, speakers and computer mice before making the leap to the ultimate consumer device: cell phone.

I’m nervous at first – I’ve never soldered anything in my life. That makes me a good test subject, Mellis says. “I’m interested in trying to open up the process to people who haven’t really done this stuff before,” he says.

Soldering felt a little like doing a colour-by-numbers painting – I was filling in spaces on the circuit board, but my understanding of how the parts fit together was pretty sparse. And a lot of components were still out of my control. I used Mellis’s software, for instance, which gives the phone capabilities similar to that of a 10-year-old Nokia phone: it can make and receive calls and texts, store up to 255 phone numbers, and has a clock.

The whole thing costs about $100 in parts, excluding the SIM card. Nearly all of the components came from online electronics or hobbyist shops, he says, and the instructions and source code are available on his website. However, the GSM module, which connects the phone to the cellular network and translates audio signals to the speaker and microphone, came from a Chinese e-commerce website.

The back of the phone has spaces for working parts: the GSM module; a microcontroller, which brings signals from the GSM module to the buttons and screen; a matchstick-sized antenna; and a SIM card holder. I bought the SIM card, with its month-to-month data-free plan, from the T Mobile store – connecting to the network is one thing I can’t do myself.

When it was time to laser cut the case, I used Mellis’s designs. That means my phone is identical to his prototype, which he has been using as his mobile phone for the past three months. The end result is a little coarse and chunky, but ends up about the size and thickness of my Android smartphone. I’m already thinking of ways to make it my own. I could knit it a case. I could paint it. I could design a new cover and have it laser cut myself.

I’m also thinking of ways I could use it. One of Mellis’s labmates wants to make a phone with a single button for his grandma to call him. Another says that if she ever has kids, she’ll give them a phone that only calls her.

I’m not ready to throw away my smartphone just yet. But I might start taking this phone on holiday, so I can escape Facebook and email but still make calls. And because I built it, I’m starting to grow quite attached to it.


Blowfish12@2013 blowfish12.tk Author: Sudharsun. P. R.

Facebook hacked, Java disabled

Facebook has been hacked and has disabled Java environment.

Facebook announced that it was hacked in its blog post after some of its employees visited an infected mobile developer website in January. It assures that user data hasn’t been compramised after its security breach.

“They gained limited visibility into our systems,” Fred Wolens, a spokesperson for Facebook, told in an interview, “We’ve accelerated our program to disable Java in our environment.”

“The company explained in the blog post that the laptops that were infected were “fully patched” and ran the most up-to-date antivirus software prior to the infection. It is currently working with law enforcement to dig into the hack’s details. The malware came through another issue with Java, the programming language that Oracle recently patched to fix a number of other issues. The Department of Homeland Security even recommended that people uninstall Java since hackers were finding new holes often.”

“After analyzing the compromised website where the attack originated, we found it was using a ‘zero-day,’ previously unseen exploit to bypass the Java sandbox (built-in protections) to install the malware,” said Facebook in the blog post. “We immediately reported the exploit to Oracle, and they confirmed our findings and provided a patch on February 1, 2013, that addresses this vulnerability.”

Facebook has not specified who the attackers are, and it very well may not know. The company does, however, say that it was “not alone in this attack” and that it wanted to tell the world about this hack quickly so that others can start their own remediation.


Blowfish12@2013 blowfish12.tk Author: Sudharsun. P. R.