iPhone 6 on sale in Chine

 

China’s largest mobile carrier is now accepting orders for the iPhone 6 ahead of the model’s official launch, according to China Daily. The new phone will be available from China Mobile Beijing.  China Mobile is the largest mobile phone operator by subscribers, with 760 million of them. (That’s equivalent to more than double the population of the U.S.)

The site has already received over 33,000 orders for the new devices since Tuesday evening.

China Mobile appears to have also inadvertently confirmed rumors that Apple will release two versions of iPhone 6, in different sizes. The China Mobile Beijing site is giving users the choice between a 4.7- and a 5.5-inch iPhone 6. However, the site has not released accompanying images or provided a release date.

In the past, China Mobile has offered online reservations for unannounced Apple devices —  it did a similar thing with the iPhone 5S last year. Apple’s media event is next Tuesday, when the company is expected to officially unveil iPhone 6.


Blowfish12@2014 blowfish12.tk Source: Yahoo

Planning to buy a cell Phone? why not Build it!

David Mellis is a graduate student in the High-Low Tech lab, a group of engineering has built a custom cell phone himself. In 2005, he helped found Arduino, a company that makes easy-to-program microprocessors and sells them on simple circuit boards. The idea is to help people make electronic products without needing a degree in computer science.

custombuiltcellphone

They’re popular among hobbyists, hackers and the sort of people who end up working at the Media Lab but they’re hardly mainstream. Mellis wondered if he could take the idea further  and build a cell phone. “The tricky thing is getting it beyond the people who are already doing electronics stuff,” he says. So he decided to see if he could design consumer electronics that you can make yourself and actually use. He started with radios, speakers and computer mice before making the leap to the ultimate consumer device: cell phone.

I’m nervous at first – I’ve never soldered anything in my life. That makes me a good test subject, Mellis says. “I’m interested in trying to open up the process to people who haven’t really done this stuff before,” he says.

Soldering felt a little like doing a colour-by-numbers painting – I was filling in spaces on the circuit board, but my understanding of how the parts fit together was pretty sparse. And a lot of components were still out of my control. I used Mellis’s software, for instance, which gives the phone capabilities similar to that of a 10-year-old Nokia phone: it can make and receive calls and texts, store up to 255 phone numbers, and has a clock.

The whole thing costs about $100 in parts, excluding the SIM card. Nearly all of the components came from online electronics or hobbyist shops, he says, and the instructions and source code are available on his website. However, the GSM module, which connects the phone to the cellular network and translates audio signals to the speaker and microphone, came from a Chinese e-commerce website.

The back of the phone has spaces for working parts: the GSM module; a microcontroller, which brings signals from the GSM module to the buttons and screen; a matchstick-sized antenna; and a SIM card holder. I bought the SIM card, with its month-to-month data-free plan, from the T Mobile store – connecting to the network is one thing I can’t do myself.

When it was time to laser cut the case, I used Mellis’s designs. That means my phone is identical to his prototype, which he has been using as his mobile phone for the past three months. The end result is a little coarse and chunky, but ends up about the size and thickness of my Android smartphone. I’m already thinking of ways to make it my own. I could knit it a case. I could paint it. I could design a new cover and have it laser cut myself.

I’m also thinking of ways I could use it. One of Mellis’s labmates wants to make a phone with a single button for his grandma to call him. Another says that if she ever has kids, she’ll give them a phone that only calls her.

I’m not ready to throw away my smartphone just yet. But I might start taking this phone on holiday, so I can escape Facebook and email but still make calls. And because I built it, I’m starting to grow quite attached to it.


Blowfish12@2013 blowfish12.tk Author: Sudharsun. P. R.

I am surprised to know that Amazon has a data center that is comparable with google’s one.

Huan Liu's Blog

(Edit 3/16/2012: I am surprised that this post is picked up by a lot of media outlets. Given the strong interest, I want to emphasize what is measured and what is derived. The # of server racks in EC2 is what I am directly observing. By assuming 64 physical servers in a rack, I can derive the rough server count. But remember this is an *assumption*. Check the comments below that some think that AWS uses 1U server, others think that AWS is less dense. Obviously, using a different assumption, the estimated server number would be different. For example, if a credible source tells you that AWS uses 36 1U servers in each rack, the number of servers would be 255,600. An additional note: please visit my disclaimer page. This is a personal blog, only represents my personal opinion, not my employer’s.)

Similar to the EC2 CPU utilization rate

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